Assessing with Storytelling: Final Writing Project

Doing writing assignments in class is key to avoid the dreaded Google Translate mosnter.

In another post I talked about using timed-writes as an assessment tool. This is great for people who over-monitor their writing, and it affords me the opportunity to see a snapshot of my students’ true level of spontaneous written production.

When I learn languages on my own, I will often use timed-writes to track my progress. The benefit of having someone correct my writing is limited because my interlanguage is constantly evolving as I get more comprehensible input.

The same is true for students. As long as they keep getting comprehensible input, their interlanguage more closely approximates native level L2.

While I believe timed-writes good enough evaluate student progress on their own, I also like to afford students the opportunity to demonstrate what they can produce with their monitor activated.

On the last day of instruction I have students write an original story in class using the language they have learned during the quarter. While the timed-writes show much how fluently they can write, the original story lets me see their best writing.

The Final Writing Project

I give students two weeks notice of the content of this assessment (although they have access to the rubric all quarter), and they can prepare as they see fit. Some plan out a well-structured story and other wing it the day of. Students get a whole class period to write the story (not to exceed 300 words, I don’t want to read these things for more than a couple of days), and they can leave when they finish. Some leave in 20 minutes, others take the whole class period.

Note: To avoid the headaches of Google Translate, this assignment only works if it’s done in class.

The structure of the assessment asks students to use all the big verbs: to be, to want, to have, to go, to like, etc., and I have a rubric that makes grading a piece of cake, pan comido. Below are the instructions students will see on the day of the assessment (or in the course documents from the beginning of the quarter if they bother to look there):

You will have the approximately 45 minutes to write an original story in Spanish. Your story should have a minimum of 200 words and a maximum of 300 words. Previous writing assignments have focused on word count under a time constraint, but this exercise is different. Here I am looking for your best writing. Please take your time and edit your sentences carefully.

The events in your story are entirely up to you, but your writing should flow nicely and reach a logical conclusion. Below is a sample story structure (similar to the format we generally use in class to co-create stories) that may help you write more:

  • Introduce and describe your main character(s)
    • Where are they from? How old are they? What are they like? How are they feeling? Etc.
  • Define the problem
    • Your character(s) should want something but be unable to get it at the beginning.
  • Movement 1
    • Your character(s) should go somewhere and ask for help to get what they want (dialogue).
    • Your character(s) should not solve the problem in this location.
  • Movement 2
    • Your character(s) should go to a new location and ask for help (dialogue).
    • Your character(s) should solve the problem in this location.
  • Tie up loose ends
    •  -How does the story resolve? Are there psychological or moral changes in your character(s) (i.e. How do(es) your character(s) grow?)
    • Use the falling action to close any loops you may have opened.

How I Grade the Final Writing Project

Naturally, I have a rubric for grading this assignment. It makes it easy to evaluate and allows me to be more objective. You will find it below:

Communication and Flow

10 203040
Student failed to demonstrate successful  communication in Spanish. The message was difficult to discern and was difficult to follow.  Many choppy sentences.Student demonstrated limited communication in Spanish. The message was somewhat difficult to discern and was often difficult to follow. Many choppy sentences.Student demonstrated level-appropriate communication in Spanish. The message was somewhat clear and was mostly easy to follow. Few choppy sentences.Student demonstrated successful communication in Spanish of the events of a story Spanish. The message was clear and was easy to follow. No choppy sentences. 

Communication is the most important factor that I look for when grading this assessment. I want to see students express themselves clearly and with good flow. This part of the rubric shows the four main categories student work may fall into, but I can break it down more if need be. Perhaps a student has too many choppy sentences to earn all 40 points, for instance. I could give the student a 35 and call it good.

Grammar and Vocabulary

10203040
Student demonstrated poor accuracy in grammar forms covered in class and understanding of relevant vocabulary. Many spelling and accentuation errors.Student demonstrated below-average accuracy in grammar forms covered in class and understanding of relevant vocabulary. Some spelling and accentuation errors.Student demonstrated acceptable accuracy in grammar forms covered in class and understanding of relevant vocabulary. Few spelling and accentuation errors.Student demonstrated above-average accuracy in grammar forms covered in class and understanding of relevant vocabulary. Very few or no spelling or accent errors.

This is one of the few times in my course that I evaluate grammar in context. Since students have time to think about what they are writing, I feel it important to evaluate them on this point. If they mess a few things up it will not destroy their grade, nor should it.

Spelling and accentuation also count here, but not that much. In the process of acquisition it’s okay to make spelling mistakes. I still misspell things in English and Spanish all the time (especially in English), and those are the languages I speak best. I would dread it if someone evaluated my spelling in my beginner French (Je ne parle pas très bien le français… yet).

Creativity 

5101520
Student’s work was not original (e.g. wrote a summary of a story we co-created in class). Student failed to include details from the outline above.Student’s work was minimally original. (e.g. Student copied the details from a previous class story, but changed a few details). Student included some details from the outline above.Student’s work was original and included many details from the outline above. Student included some creative dialogue.Student’s work was original and included all the requested details from the outline above. Student included creative dialogue and went above and beyond by showing how their character(s) changed at the end of the story.

The last part of this rubric is the one that I struggle to justify with 100 percent confidence. This quarter I have included it because I need a way to hold students accountable for preparing for the assessment. In the past I didn’t include this section and some students used a story we had co-created in class and just changed the names—not exactly the spirit of this assignment.

I also want to reward students for going through the process of writing a story in L2. It’s difficult, but by the end of the quarter even the lower students should be able to approximate the stories we co-created in class and make enough modifications to be original.

One Last Note on Rubrics

No rubric is perfect and, the way I see it, most of them are too crude to give a highly precise assessment. For example, is this rubric really sensitive enough to give an 83.5%? I don’t think that it is. For this reason I round all scores to the nearest 5%. It makes grading easier because it gives larger error bars to help assess the grade, even though the assessment tool itself is imperfect.

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