Systematizing Interpersonal Communication

Making systems is critical if you want to stay sane as an instructor. If you’ve gotten to the point of teaching languages for a living, you’ve invented systems that work for you, even if you don’t realize it. In the last two years, I’ve finally been able to systematize a gradebook item that had frustrated me for years: interpersonal communication.

I tried to make this work with an electronic attendance taker (Skyward when I taught at high school and Canvas at the College), but it was always clunky. Not good for systematization. I finally had a breakthrough when I went back to basics – good ol’ fashioned pen and paper. Below is a mockup of a what an Interpersonal Communication scoresheet looks like. You can download a .docx version for free here.

Let me break down what’s on this sheet, because there is actually quite a bit.

0. I write down what week I’m in at the top of the page. I keep each class’ work in a color-coded folder (which can be a separate post if there is demand for me to write such a post), and the number helps me keep the pages in order if they get lost.

  1. The first column (labeled “A”) is an absence column. I want to know how many absences a student has. In my class, they will lose 1% off their final grade if they have more than three absences. This lets me keep track without having to turn the page.
  2. The second column (labeled “#”) is just to see how many students are in my class. Frankly, it’s not that important, except to start the quarter. It helps me consider how many students I want to overload, if any.
  3. The “student” column is just my learners’ names. I try to leave enough space here to write down their preferred name. After the first week I change names to preferred names so I don’t have to keep correcting it by hand. Systematization and whatnot.
  4. “Days of the week” columns – One column for each day of the week. I keep track of attendance and interpersonal communication here (see below).
  5. The “IC” column is for writing my students’ Interpersonal Communication grade for the week. Each day is worth 5 points, so I write a number in this column at the end of the week.

The Andrew Snider’s Super-Fancy, Awesomest Systematization of Interpersonal Communication™ in Action

This is easier to write on by hand vs. on a trackpad, so forgive the sloppiness. Not that my handwriting is any better.

Let me break this down for you. This is a week-1 Interpersonal Communication scoresheet at the end of the week.

  1. The course started on a Tuesday, so I crossed out Monday. This also happens on holidays or if I have to cancel class. This week will only be worth 20 points.
  2. Dots represent a student being present. Unless otherwise marked, they earn full points for that day. Easy and quick, two of my favorite words.
  3. I start each class period handing back name tags, even after I memorized their names. I say hello to each and every student and ask how they are doing. At the end of greetings, I take the name tags of those not present, and quickly make them absent. This is the fastest way I have ever taken roll. It’s also great for building class community.
  4. For each absence, I write A1, A2, A3, etc. in the appropriate box. It helps me to quickly see how many absences somebody has. If they start to wrack up (it happens, especially at the CC), this lets me know how many absences somebody has without having to add. I don’t like unnecessary math.
  5. There is a T up there for student 5. That means they walked in late, for which they lost points. I’m sometimes lenient with this, but it can and will become a problem if you’re too lax about it.
  6. One of my waitlist students was there every day! Welcome aboard, Waitlisted 1!
  7. One of my roster students was absent every day! They are now losing points for each absence (and 1% off their final grade per absence above 3 – You can’t learn a language if you’re not in class).
  8. I tally up all their absences and write it on the of the week (below). This lets me line up next week’s page with this one and quickly write in the number of absences each student has.
  9. Once per week (never more), I take sit down at the computer and enter in this grade. I type as fast as I can and go right down the IC column on my sheet. I will batch my boring work and do it quickly, or be damned to live a life of data entry.

Below is my week-2 Interpersonal Communication Scoresheet. It’s updated so that non-attendees are gone. SNYDER, SPELLED WRONG finally emailed me and said he’d be there. I didn’t have do an admin drop because he contacted me. As you can see, he’s attending but not demonstrating interpersonal communication. He’s really just a blob in the back of the classroom, and blobs don’t communicate well.

Sometimes I write a reason why students lost points. P (phone), E (English), O (off task when I observed) are quick ways to remember why it happened in the off-chance that a student comes asking. They usually don’t come asking.

The End of the Term

At the end of the quarter, I modify my sheet to look something like the grade sheet above. I copy over absences to this sheet. Then I copy students’ final percentage from the gradebook and convert it to a GPA using the scale from the syllabus. If the student stopped attending, I write down their last date of attendance. This makes it a cinch to enter in final grades. I paper clip all the sheets to gather (from end of quarter to beginning of quarter) and keep that stack in my box of graded materials from that quarter. It’s come in handy many times.

Assessing with Storytelling: Reimagining the Syllabus

Happy New Year! Feliz Ano Novo! ¡Feliz Año Nuevo! Etcetera!

The new year is always a time of reflection for me. What went well? What was a disaster? What could I cut and what could I reimagine? There’s much to upon which reflect.

On the surface, last quarter felt like the best term I’ve ever taught, and yet I still find myself back at the drawing board. You see, I was overassessing and had too many assignments during the last week of class.

I did feel satisfied with the assessments I created, but it was too much of a burden on my learners. Additionally, overassessing didn’t provide me with much insight into how learners were progressing (How much could they acquire from Monday to Tuesday?).

With this in mind, I have created a new set of assessments, listed below, in no particular order. Notice that the grammar tests are gone, although I will still assess grammar in other ways.

AssignmentPoints
Oral Story Test100
Timed-Writes (8 x 25 pts each)200
Quizzes (10 x 6 pts each)60
“Yo puedo…”s 4 x 50200
Online Homework (VHL Central, Canvas)200
Attendance/Interpersonal Communication275
Total:1035

Oral Story Test

This is the same assignment as last quarter. It is the capstone to my course, letting learners demonstrate their ability to communicate orally.

Timed-Writes

Again, this is the same assignment as last quarter. I liked this, as it forced students to re-read the stories we co-created in class.

Quizzes

This has evolved since I last posted about quizzes in my courses. I will update the quizzes post/write a new one in the near future. It deserves a revisit.

“Yo Puedo”s – “Can Do”s

This is a new assessment in my classes that I will detail further in a new post. I’m excited about these because they are replacing the old “textbook” tests I was giving before. They will oral assessments, and I will be grade them with ruthless efficiency (My favorite way to grade).

Online Homework

VHL Central (Online Workbook)

My students have to buy a textbook that comes with an online workbook (not a fan, but has been the textbook since before I got there). I know it’s expensive, so I make sure they use it. Its grammar focus leads me to believe it has little value for actual acquisition, so I have them complete this as homework.

It does provide some input, and the students that complete it do acquire more Spanish. The students that don’t complete it (a surprising number) demonstrate why it’s not the ideal use of time – It’s too incomprehensible and not engaging!

Canvas (LMS)

I have written a number of short stories and have designed comprehension activities to go along with them. I plan on making this portion of my class available after a few more rounds of revision.

Attendance/Interpersonal Communication

This is much the same as last quarter. You have to be there to demonstrate interpersonal communication./Showing up is half the battle.

Looking Forward

I will continue to revise my assessments every quarter from now until I retire from teaching. It’s something that I have to do to keep improving as an instructor, and it’s something that I will continue to share with you as I make incremental (or huge and abrupt) changes.

Happy storytelling!

How to Prevent Students from Asking if They Can Make Up an Assignment

How can we painlessly mitigate one of the most annoying questions we get asked?

I know the syllabus says no late work is accepted for any reason, but have you ever made an exception?

I went on a trip/I got sick/My car broke down/My dog’s fourth-cousin once removed passed away recently/The line at Starbucks was really long/I didn’t hear my alarm/I had to take my little sister to see Santa but I forgot that it’s January and Christmas is over/ad infinitum

– Every student ever

It doesn’t hurt to ask, or so says our culture (at least in the U.S.A.). Generally, that is pretty good advice. I mean, it’s actually pretty good advice. The worst that could happen is that the professor says no.

Okay, I’ll admit that I can’t actually stop your students from asking if they can make up an assignment they missed (This is a problem for me because I’m still finding my courage to be disliked). But I have devised a system where I can provide leniency when necessary while remaining fair to all the other students, and not having to reopen closed assignments. I’ve had to pull my hair out way less frequently (which is good, because I don’t have a lot of hair to spare, especially in the front).

The Fabulous Four

1. Interpersonal Communication

Students are allowed three missed hours of class in my courses before it hurts their interpersonal communication grade. I need them to be present in order to evaluate their interpersonal communication, but I also understand that college students get sick, have emergencies, and occasionally need a mental health day. Missing a total of three days throughout the term isn’t going to impact their overall acquisition in any meaningful way.

Students email me all the time at the beginning of the quarter worrying about missing class and how it will affect their grade (it’s always about the grade, isn’t it?). I respond in three sentences that I don’t even have to think about. 

Hello, [language learner].

Oh no, [being sick] is never fun! You can miss up to three class periods before you begin to lose interpersonal communication points. Make sure you get any notes on what you missed from a classmate when you get back.

All my best,

Prof. Snider

2. Listening Quizzes

I give listening quizzes once per story that we tell. Throughout a term there are anywhere between 8-10 listening quizzes. It is inevitable that students will miss these, and they can be a huge pain in the butt to manage if you’re not careful.

My solution is to drop the lowest score from the gradebook (mine does this automatically!).

Billy: I missed class yesterday because I had the flu.

Me: Oh no! That’s terrible! I hate being sick!

Billy: I heard we had a listening quiz… Would I be able to make that up?

Me: Unfortunately, there are no make ups on listening quizzes, but I have good news! The lowest listening quiz score is automatically dropped.

Billy: Oh, okay. Thanks!

*Three weeks later*

Billy: I missed class yesterday because my cat had the sniffles.

Me: Oh no! That’s terrible! I hate being sick! 

Billy: I heard we had a listening quiz… Would I be able to make that up?

Me: Unfortunately, there are no make ups on listening quizzes, but I have good news! The lowest listening quiz score is automatically dropped.

Billy: Oh, okay. Thanks.

3. Timed Writes

Learners in my class do a timed write for every story we co-create. That means they have approximately 8-10 opportunities to miss a timed write. Same solution as the listening quiz. Drop the lowest score, and stay true to your word. You are giving flexibility to each and every student (which many of them need). You are also being fair to all the other students

4. Everything Else

No assignment in my class can be made up after the fact, but I will work with students if they know they are going to miss a quiz or a test beforehand and they communicate that for me. I tell them this up front and I keep my word. I highly value communication de antemano.

Conclusion

Dropping the lowest score in a given category is the easiest thing I have ever done to mitigate one of the most annoying questions we professors face (i.e. Will you make an exception even though the syllabus says no exceptions?). Now I show my students empathy and flexibility, but I also stay true to my word and don’t accept late work for any reason.

Better than aspirin for curing headaches.

Disclosure: Please note that some of the links above are affiliate links, and at no additional cost to you, I will earn a commission if you decide to make a purchase after clicking through the link. Please understand that I have experienced all of these books/products and I recommend them because they are helpful and useful, not because of the small commissions I make if you decide to buy something through my links. Please do not spend any money on these products unless you feel you need them or that they will help you achieve your goals.


Storytelling Basics: A Weekly Structure

Find increased freedom through intentional planning.

Using storytelling to teach language dramatically reshaped the the structure of my courses. A progressively complex series of stories now anchor my lesson plans, instead of being shackled to the “communicative” activities in the textbook and its grammar-driven agenda. In addition, storytelling freed me from hours of lesson planning, since the stories we tell contain all the elements of the language I need students to learn. The mere act of telling and retelling a story (and later reading a story) affords learners the comprehensible input necessary for acquisition to take place.

Since I know that everything I need to teach is embedded in the stories we co-create, retell and read, I learned to systematize the way I plan my lessons. After I make a tentative calendar of the course before the term starts, I barely have to think of how I’m going to fill the lesson plan with activities. This alone can save you ten hours during the quarter, and more if you are on semesters.

Allow me to detail a sample week in my Spanish 101 course.

The Goal

It’s essential to start with a goal in mind, some activity you want students to be able to do by the end of the week.

My primary objective for the week is for students to write a summary of a story in L2 that they helped co-create, listened to, read several versions of, and discussed at length in class (See Friday).

Secondary objective: Have a class discussion about the most complicated version of the text (see Thursday).

Monday

Below you will see a numbered list and details of my lesson plan for a typical Monday. Something I learned from working at a high school for a semester (it was the longest six months of my life, but a great learning experience) is to write an abbreviated version of this plan on the board in L2. It keeps me zoned into the plan and allows students to see where today’s lesson is going.

1. Routine Items

An essential way to talk about simple (and often boring) things. Things that need repetition to acquire, but that don’t make much sense to talk about in every single story. I mix and match these to keep them fresh.

  • The date
  • Months
  • Days of the Week
  • The Weather
  • Interrogative words (I have a little song that I do to help them memorize, although they do this during stories, too)
  • Tongue twisters
  • TPR (Total Physical Response) words/phrases that aren’t easy for me to work into every story. Prepositions of place (next to, near to, far from, etc.), indefinite/negative words, etc.
  • What did you do last weekend?
  • Body Parts
  • Short songs that don’t target anything in particular, but help students remember the language in a natural context (a natural way to introduce subjunctive, by the way).
  • Anything else that can be routinized

1A. Free Voluntary Reading (FVR)

2. TPR New Phrases

I take 3 – 6 phrases/words out of the script for this week’s story that I think the students won’t know very well. These are the anchor phrases that will help us scaffold into telling a comprehensible story. Without these phrases, the story will be too incomprehensible to maximize the potential of the input. By pre-teaching these phrases we ensure that the essence of the story be comprehensible.

I know my students and their level, so I can confidently guess what they know and what they don’t. These phrases will help scaffold lower-level students to each progressively difficult version of the story.

I write the phrases on the board and explain what they mean, one by one in English, a mix of Spanish/English, or a mix of Spanish/drawings/photos depending on the level of the class. This weeks target phrases:

  • he likes to celebrate
  • he receives a package
  • it’s moving
  • he’s afraid of
  • Can you open it?

We make up gestures for each phrase and I “quiz” them on these gestures. I say a word/phrase, and they show me the answer. After a few days of this, I might show them a gesture and ask them to say the word in Spanish.

As I discussed in an earlier post, TPR is a great way to reduce L1 in your classroom after Monday. The next day I don’t tell them what things mean in English, I just do the gesture.

3. The Hero’s Journey

I use Mondays (depending on the week) to continue the Epic Hero’s Adventure based on our co-created heroes. I use Storylistening as a primary way to recap the story with students, and I use TPRS© to co-create the next phase of the story.

While students are listening, I ask them to draw what happens in the story to help them stay focused on processing the information. I don’t collect this,  though, and they could just listen along, and I would be content. Really it’s just a way to stop people from being on their phones (I hate smart phones in class – learning a new language requires deep mental work with limited distractions).

You can make this phase last as long as you need.

Mondays are not fundays for most college students. Some are coming in sluggish from a weekend out partying, while others are dreading getting back into the swing of things after a relaxing weekend (or not so relaxing, depending on the student). With this in mind, Mondays should mostly be listening days. Get their ears used to hearing L2 again, and you will be rewarded with students who are more prepared to think and talk in L2 throughout the rest of the week.

Tuesday

1. Routine Items

Keep on trucking with these. They pay dividends in the long run.

1A. FVR

2. Review TPR Phrases from Yesterday

If you used L1 to establish meaning yesterday, now is the time to go right to L2. Most will not need it on this day, and by removing L1 you are showing students the importance of L2 in your classroom.

3. Co-create the Story

Here is the bread and butter of storytelling in a language classroom. I introduce a character and build a story from there using many circular questions (fewer for upper-level classes, since I mainly use this technique to introduce new vocabulary). Students decide many details about the character as they would in a OWI (i.e. hair color, height, intelligence, nationality, etc.).

Next, I follow the story script (I always have this with me so I can refer back to it) and guide the story along until the next detail I let them decide (e.g. Where does the character go?,  Who sent the package?, Why is the character afraid?, etc.). After each unique detail (sometimes called a surprise detail in the TPRS© community), I continue on with the script until we have reached a good stopping place or if we run out of time in the class period.

In this way, each class has its own unique story generated from the same script. They all have the target phrases in them, but each story has the potential to be wildly different from the others. This is what personalized instruction looks like in a storytelling classroom. It beats the hell out of a cookie-cutter and textbook-heavy approach.

Some Bonus Tips

  1. When you get to a target phrase or structure, cue students to do the appropriate gesture. This will help cement the phrase and gesture in a communicative context.
  2. During the co-creation of the story, I have a student write a brief listening quiz based on today’s story.
  3. Also during the co-creation of the story, I have a student draw out the events of the story on a giant sticky note. Four-six frames usually works perfect for this. Look at Wednesday’s plan for more details on what I do with this.
An example of student artwork on a giant sticky note.

4. Summarize the Story

Usually we have discussed a lot of information during the class period, so it’s nice to review what you’ve told. Some storytellers I know like to write up a brief summary of the story in a word document with the help of students. I would call that an efficient and beneficial use of time.

Full disclosure, I don’t always do this. I like students to hear the language a number of times before they see it.

5. Listening Quiz (if There’s Time)

There’s probably not going to be time today, unless it’s the beginning of the quarter. When students are less proficient, there’s more time for assessments like this because they can’t sustain the necessary conversation as easily (yet).

Wednesday

1. Routine Items

Stick with the same routine items until you sense it gets boring. Students need more repetition than they let on, and doing things like talking about the date or weather goes a long way towards acquisition of those items. I would do those even if they’re boring. Routine is a powerful thing.

1A. FVR

2. Review TPR Phrases

Try quizzing students by showing them the gestures and having them say the word/phrase in L2. Mix up the order of the words. Really make sure they know these phrases since they anchor this week’s text.

3. Retell the Co-created Story with Student Artwork

Student artwork from a different class.

Remember the artwork from Tuesday? Here’s where this comes into play. After reviewing the TPR phrases again, I put the giant sticky on the board and let the students process the artwork for the first time. This lets students see the story visually and it puts them in the right frame of mind (read: activates schema) to hear the story again.

Now I begin to retell the story that we made up yesterday. This artwork is important for me too, since I have four classes and can easily jumble stories together Did that happen in the 8am class or the 11am class? – I don’t have to remember (thankfully). I just have to look at the artwork to jog my memory.

I do a blend of storytelling and story asking here.

Me: Class, there is a _____.

Student: man.

Me: There is a man. What does he call himself?

Student: Chuy.

Me: Yes, he calls himself Chuy. Where is Chuy from? Is he from Ecuador?

Student: No.

Me: No, he’s not from Ecuador. Where’s he from?

Student: He’s Spanish.

Me: Yes, he’s Spanish. He’s from Spain. Is Chuy handsome?

Student: Oh yeah.

Me: Oh, yes. Chuy is very handsome.

Me: One day, Chuy receives a package for his birthday. He likes to celebrate his birthday. He loves to celebrate his birthday.

Back and forth we go, recounting the events we made up yesterday. We can do this for 5-15 minutes, depending on the complexity of the story and the quality of the conversation. The important part is that students are mentally processing all the input I’m giving them, which primes the pump of acquisition.

I started doing this part of the storytelling process more regularly last fall when I found a pad of giant stickies in my classroom. What a stroke of good fortune.

4. Read Version A of the Story Silently

I break the story into three readings, each increasing in complexity.  I have students read Version A silently for a 2-5 minutes, depending on the length of the story. Before they read, I instruct them to read for fluency. If they come across a word they don’t know, they should quickly try to figure it out from context. If they can’t do that in 2-3 seconds, they underline and move on. Consider an example of a Version A reading below:

After students have read the text, we come together as a class for students to do a self-assessment of comprehension. We do this via a “choral translation” or a translation done as a group. I read a little bit in L2, and the class responds out loud with a translation into L1. 

Occasionally I will throw in a brief (under 30 seconds) grammar explanation in L1 here, or use colors and underlining in a Word Document projected on the screen to highlight meaning (e.g. He drinks the milk >>> He drinks it).

A lot of people feel very strongly about never doing a translation in a language classroom, perhaps because we know how inefficient and ineffective the grammar-translation method is for language acquisition.

Personally, I don’t think we should throw out any tool completely (even the textbook-style activities).

That being said, I think it’s important to note that this activity is not the grammar-translation method. It is a way for students to self-assess comprehension and for me to get a feel on their level of comprehension.

In all honesty, if I wasn’t confident this was a beneficial activity, I would not hesitate throw it out. I truly believe this is worth the five-ten minutes we spend on it per week.

5. Read Version B of the story à la TPRS© with a Volleyball Translation

Another translation activity? Yes. This one is also worth the 10 minutes per week we spend on it.

Students form two lines and make sure they have a partner across from them. They read Version B of the story in the following way:

  1. Student A reads a sentence of the story in L2.
  2. Student B translates that sentence into L1 and reads the next sentence in L2.
  3. Student A translates that sentence into L1 and reads the next sentence in L2.
  4. The partners volley back and forth from L2 and L1, with the goal of getting back to L2 as quickly as possible.
  5. After two minutes, I yell for students to switch and one line rotates so that everyone has a new partner (Note: If there is an odd number of students I like to have a group of three at the front of the lines where one member rotates out each round).
  6. After switching, students pick up where the person that got the least far left off. For example, if student A got to line 4 and Student B got to line 6, they would start at line 4. That way each student gets a chance to get through the whole reading.
  7. If students finish Version B, I have them start again from the top. I’d love it if they could get through it at least 3 times, though often it doesn’t happen. 
  8. Repeat until you want them to stop. I usually let them go for at least ten minutes, but rarely more than 15.

Students love this activity because it helps them build confidence speaking the language. I love this activity because students help each other out, and it allows them to hear a number of different voices.

Below is an example of a Version B

I first learned about this technique at a TPRS© workshop I attended in Vancouver, BC. At the workshop, Von Ray presented a German story and a French story, and we did a volleyball translation. The act of participating made me realize how valuable this activity is. It’s not really a translation activity at all, but rather a comprehension-based reading where the students assess their own understanding. Totally different things.

If you’re not convinced by my explanation and advocacy for this activity, you need to try it in a language with which you are not familiar. You will be convinced that it has nothing to do with the grammar-translation approach, even though translation is involved.

Attend one of these workshops, by the way. It’s well worth the three days. Von Ray was fantastic as a presenter. Mike Coxon is another great presenter. I am not an affiliate of theirs – I just think they are awesome at what they do).

6. Listening Quiz (If there’s time)

Sometimes there is time on Wednesday for a listening quiz. I write it on the board, but I’m not heart-broken if we don’t get to it today. That just means that our comprehensible input lasted the whole class period. That’s more important for acquisition than squeezing in a quiz.

7. Retells in groups (if there’s time)

If you still have time left over, now’s a good time to do a retell. Pair off students and have them retell the story in L2 for one minute each. Put the artwork back on the board if you took it down. This will help students remember more details.

Thursday

1. Routine Items

Same as previous days. There’s something comforting about a routine. It also helps you focus the class on a common theme to start the class. Make sure students are all participating. Call them out by name or they will start to use their cell phones. (Cell phones are the bane of my existence as a professor of a subject that requires deep focus).

1A. FVR

2. Review TPR Phrases

I keep a running list of TPR Phrases on Canvas, my school’s LMS. On a typical Thursday we go through the whole list.

At the end of the term I give a significant quiz (~5% of the overall grade) based entirely on this vocabulary. Reviewing it once per week helps keep it fresh in their minds.

3. Retell story with student artwork

Another repetition of the story using the artwork. Today I ask more questions and do less telling of the story. Students are starting to build confidence in their knowledge of the story and remember most details at this point. 

4. Read Version C of the story and Discuss

As a class we read Version C, the longest and most complex version of the story. I read out loud in L2 while students listen and read along. There are two goals with this activity:

  1. I want students to hear and read (and comprehend) the text. It gives them an opportunity to simultaneously hear how the text sounds and how it looks on the page.
  2. I want students to discuss the themes of the story in L2.

As I read out loud, students follow along in their copy of the text. I read until I find something interesting to talk about, and then I start asking questions. In the example of Version C (see below), there’s no coffee at Kevin’s house. It’s a problem because he has an important chemistry exam that day. I might ask the class something like this:

Class, where do you all go when there’s no coffee at your house?

If someone answers, great. Ask follow up questions in L2 that are interesting and keep the language flowing.  Build up your students and don’t correct them if they make mistakes. Any output is good, and we don’t want to scare them away from speaking.

If no one answers, that’s fine. Now’s the time to do a quick conversation with their “elbow partner”.

With your elbow partner, ask this question: Where do you go when there’s no coffee at your house?

I usually write the beginning of a potential answer on the board to keep the conversation going. (i.e. When there’s no coffee at my house, I go to…). After a brief conversation in groups, I call the attention back to the front of the classroom and ask the question again. Now I look for volunteers to share their answers with the class. Once the mojo has been used up for that particular set of questions (read the room), I keep reading the text and find a new line of questioning.

An example of Version C of a story.

Continue this as long as possible. If you do this right, the conversation can spill over into Friday’s class.

5. Listening Quiz

This is usually the day where we end up taking the listening quiz, although if the conversation is really good during Version C of the story, perhaps not. It’s possible that you need to continue the Version C exercise on Friday. If so, that’s great! I’d much rather have a real conversation in L2 than do a listening quiz.

6. Oral retells in groups

If there’s time you can have them practice retelling in groups. However, there shouldn’t be time if you played your cards right during the class conversation based on Version C of the story.

Friday

1. Routine Items

This is my first quarter using this as a way to start the class on a regular basis. I’m shocked at how good it is, and upset I didn’t try this earlier. Make a routine for the beginning of your class if you haven’t already.

1A. FVR

2. What are you doing this weekend?

This is an easy discussion you can throw in the mix each Friday. Share your plans for the weekend with your students, and have them ask their elbow partner what they are going to do. Circulate around the room while they are talking and select a few students to hold a conversation with.

After a few minutes, return to the front of the class and ask for volunteers to tell you their plans. This conversation could last 5-25 minutes, depending on the quality of the conversation. I think it’s better to hold an interesting, un-targeted conversation than to do just about anything else in the language.

2a. Do the listening quiz if you didn’t get to it yet.

I mean, you need to evaluate their listening skills at some point. Right? This also has the side benefit of reminding students think that there could be a listening quiz on any day, making them less likely to miss class. (Maybe?).

3. Review TPR Phrases

Go back to just the target phrases from this week. You don’t need to review the whole list each day, just enough to help it stay fresh in learners’ minds.

3a. Continue Version C Discussion (If Desired)

Did you have more story to read through/more discussion to get to in the Version C of the story? Now’s a good time to do that if you want,. but don’t feel pressured to read each and every word of the story. You don’t want to beat a dead horse.

5. Timed-Write Summary of the Story/In-Class Essay

This is the primary goal of the week. Students probably studied their story at home last night, and now they should feel fairly confident in their abilities to write a summary in L2.

6. Presentation of art, music, or culture, short videos, textbook activities, etc.

What are the things you’re passionate about when it comes to the cultures surrounding  L2? Art? Music? History? Culture? Politics? The textbook? Whatever it is at the moment, I have a good chunk of time reserved for those topics and activities here on Friday. I like to pick the activity out in advance so I know how much time to I have to spend on the other important items on Friday (i.e. timed-write summary). 

Even though I use a textbook in my class on occasion, it is not my primary vehicle for delivering CI. It is a tool I can use when desired (which is not often). I use it on a typical Friday, but only if there’s time.

Conclusions

This weekly plan is a stelar template for storytelling. It’s a system I have in place that allows me to spend virtually zero time making a lesson plan. If something isn’t working, it’s just a slight modification to the plan and I’m back in business.

Developing this lesson plan system (parts of which are borrowed from quién sabe dónde) is one of the most important steps for me as a storyteller. The structure helps me stay focused on what matters most: delivering quality CI to students in a variety of ways.

Disclosure: Please note that some of the links above are affiliate links, and at no additional cost to you, I will earn a commission if you decide to make a purchase after clicking through the link. Please understand that I have experienced all of these books/products and I recommend them because they are helpful and useful, not because of the small commissions I make if you decide to buy something through my links. Please do not spend any money on these products unless you feel you need them or that they will help you achieve your goals.

Assessing with Storytelling: Listening Comprehension Quizzes

We want to assess listening comprehension because being a competent listener is essential to learning a new language. Why? If you can understand what is spoken to you, there is a wealth of “authentic” and comprehensible input available to aid with acquisition. If not, listening to a million hours of the language won’t help you or, in this case, it won’t help our students.

Case in point, I used to listen to Korean radio station on my commute. I loved listening the flow and rhythm of the language, but I can’t tell you how to say a single thing in Korean, even after many, many hours of listening. It was incomprehensible to me and, thus, not very useful for acquisition.

Okay, so we know that student listening comprehension is important. Probably didn’t need me to convince you of that. But how do we know that students are learning to listen?

The answer is, perhaps, quite obvious: test them on their listening comprehension. 

This will lead to a washback effect, and students will subconsciously try to get better at listening and participating in the story co-creation process.

Listening Quiz Specifics

The typical listening quiz in my class is “true or false”, lasts only six questions, and is student-generated and corrected. Sound like a good assessment? Let’s look at it deeper.

For this quiz I read the questions out loud, and only twice per question. I want students to show me that they can understand the language. I also don’t want this quiz to take too much time—it’s meant to be a quick assessment.

After the quiz, students quickly exchange papers with a partner and we correct it as a class. I read each question one more time and if it’s true we say “cierto”, and if it’s false we say “falso”, and correct it so that it’s true. The following is a good example:

Me: Mario is a fat man with short arms.

Class (and me confirming) False. Mario is a fat man with long arms.

The grader writes her name on the quiz, shows the taker his score, and they pass up the quizzes to the front of the class where I collect them. 

If students have been paying attention and actively negotiating meaning, it will be an easy quiz. Very easy. This is a good thing. Doing well on a quiz boosts their confidence, lets their brain give them a metaphorical pat on the back, and allows me to build reporte by giving some easily-earned (but not entirely insignificant) points.

Another benefit of these quizzes is that they are a way to “trick” students to negotiate meaning with another repetition of the same comprehensible language. It’s a quiz, so you know they are paying attention. They have to successfully negotiate meaning at least twice – once when we co-created the story and once when I read the questions during the quiz – in order to earn the easy points (easy only for those who paid attention).

Generation of the Quiz

You could make a listening quiz take place after a reading day, in which case it would be feasible for you to make the quiz ahead of time. That’s a perfectly fine route to go with it. I prefer to have a student volunteer to write the quiz based on the story we have co-created that day. This has numerous benefits.

  1. It keeps the level of difficulty to approximately the level of the class.
  2. It saves time. I have students grade a partner’s quiz and do a random spot check to make sure they are being honest. All I have to do from there is input the scores into the gradebook.
  3. Lastly, it frees up my mind to focus more intently on the story. This is huge. I can’t imagine having the mental flexibility to co-create a story, monitor comprehension, and stay “in bounds” without outsourcing this job to a student.

Final Thoughts

This is the fastest way to grade the quiz that I have found. One quality of a good assessment is that it takes a representative sample without having to spend much time to grade. Since language acquisition takes place over many, many years, grading a lower-level quiz is perhaps the biggest waste of time for language instructors.

Ideally, I would go full-hippie and not have any grades in my class. I don’t give my son a grade on his acquisition of English or Spanish, but instead give him more opportunities to communicate in the language. Of course, that is not the context in which I find myself, and so I strive to find the best assessments that fit storytelling at the college level.

I love this assessment. It’s one of the most efficient ways to help me me to see if students are really learning to listen.

Disclosure: Please note that some of the links above are affiliate links, and at no additional cost to you, I will earn a commission if you decide to make a purchase after clicking through the link. Please understand that I have experienced all of these books/products and I recommend them because they are helpful and useful, not because of the small commissions I make if you decide to buy something through my links. Please do not spend any money on these products unless you feel you need them or that they will help you achieve your goals.

Assessing with Storytelling: Chapter Quizzes (Pretests)

Chapter quizzes offer students a different kind of feedback that will help them prepare for the grammar final (If you give one).

In a previous post I talked about the grammar final I give students, and chapter quizzes go hand-in-hand with these. After each chapter I give students a one-page quiz.

I make this quiz based off of the stories that we’ve co-created, but I also ensure they draw heavily from the relevant structures covered in the chapter. Let’s say that in chapter one we cover the verb ser, to be. I will use variations of the examples found in our stories as the base for the quiz. 

Consider the following example story fragment:

There is a girl. The girl’s name is Samantha. Samantha is a tall and intelligent girl. (Instructor question to class) Are you all popular? Yes, you are all very popular. Samantha has a sister. Her sister’s name is Beth. Beth is smart too, but Beth is not tall. She is short. Samantha says to her sister, “Are you smart?” Beth says, “Of course I’m smart. I’m Beth!”

The chapter quiz (no notes) may look something like the following:

The first girl’s name ________ Samantha.

The second girl’s name ________ Beth.

Samantha and Beth ________ sisters.

________ you all very intelligent?

Of course! You all ________ very intelligent.

I ________ very intelligent too.

We ________ very intelligent people.

This is similar to a traditional chapter test, but I want these to be very brief: a maximum of one page. This is an assessment based on sampling, and is not meant to be exhaustive. As a result, I grade heavily for comprehension and minimally on accuracy. If students understand the language on the test, they are providing evidence that they are on track.

In this way, chapter quizzes are more of a pretest, even though they are given after the chapter. I often call them pretests because they are a low-risk a way for students to see where they are doing well, and where they need to focus to succeed on the grammar final, the post test.

Each chapter quiz is only worth 25 points. This helps me out in another area: if students miss one of these assessments, they miss it. No make-ups will be given unless there are extenuating circumstances, but it’s not that big of a deal. It won’t penalize them too much to miss one of these quizzes.

A lot of students feel the need to study for this, and as a supplement I give students an exhaustive study guide for all the material covered in the text. Between storytelling and the study guide, most students are in really good shape.

If I didn’t give a grammar final, I don’t think I would give these quizzes either. But I like to afford students the opportunity to prepare for all the different assessments that happen at the end of the quarter.

Assessing with Storytelling: Final Grammar Test

People who excel at math also tend to excel at grammar tests. Pattern recognition is fine and even useful, but we testing for proficiency?

On the second to last day of instruction my students take a traditional grammar final. This exam covers all the relevant grammar covered in the course. You know what this looks like if you’ve ever given or taken a grammar test, so I won’t explain it further here.

To be completely honest, I’m not a fan of this kind of assessment. I don’t think it assesses proficiency in any meaningful way. In his book Assessing Proficiency in the Classroom, second language acquisition expert Eric Herman agrees. “New approaches require new testing methods,” posits Herman.

Note: Herman proposes some very interesting ways of evaluating students for proficiency, which I will discuss in greater detail in a another post.

I totally agree with this sentiment, and it’s why I put so much emphasis on the Oral Story Test and Final Writing Project. I think these assessments do better at evaluating proficiency than their traditional counterparts. This begs the question of why do I still give a grammar test at all?

I’ve experimented with eliminating grammar tests entirely in the past, and it made me a little nervous. Frankly, the main reasons I still give grammar tests are to prepare students who go on to take Spanish from a more traditional instructor, and to have proof that my students can still pass a traditional test. That’s it.

If everyone jumped on the storytelling/teaching with comprehensible input/feed the acquisition monster train tomorrow, I would abandon the grammar test entirely. Until then (or until I become a department head somewhere), I will keep the grammar test, despite my conviction that it doesn’t assess what I want it to assess.

With that said, you’ll notice that the grammar final (and pretests) are worth only ~18 percent of the final grade. This is by design. It minimizes student exposure to the assessment of discrete grammar items, and gives me the proof that they can still pass this kind of exam.

For now, I think this is the best solution in my context. Perhaps you have more freedom that I perceive to have. In that case, I would encourage you to think about creating some exams/assignments that better align with assessing proficiency. 

Disclosure: Please note that some of the links above are affiliate links, and at no additional cost to you, I will earn a commission if you decide to make a purchase after clicking through the link. Please understand that I have experienced all of these books/products and I recommend them because they are helpful and useful, not because of the small commissions I make if you decide to buy something through my links. Please do not spend any money on these products unless you feel you need them or that they will help you achieve your goals.

Assessing with Storytelling: Final Vocabulary Test

Gestures help establish meaning in L2, short-circuit English from the acquisition process, and can be effective for assessing knowledge of vocabulary.

Most college language textbooks include too much irrelevant vocabulary. Instead of focusing on essential vocabulary from the beginning, they want students to memorize personal pronouns out of context and every form of the verb “to be”. Unsurprisingly, this is not how we acquired our first language(s). Instead, we learn new words in context when the communicative need arrises. The thing is, I want my classroom to mimic first language acquisition as much as possible (I know L1 and L2 acquisition have differences, but I’m sure the processes are more similar than different).

How, then, do we create a storytelling system that lines up with the textbook?

I find myself in this position: my department uses a textbook and I’m the only storytelling instructor. I need to ensure that my students can leave my classroom and be successful under the tutelage of a traditional immersion-style” teacher (I would argue that an instructor who uses storytelling is also an immersion-style teacher).

The key to pulling this off is to focus the high-frequency vocabulary and hammer it home every day. I’d much rather they be able to use the most important verbs to be, to want, to have, to go, etc. than to know how to correctly conjugate every single stem-changing verb. Students are still responsible for all the vocabulary in the text on chapter pretests and the final grammar exam, but I will use our precious class time on the vocabulary that will help students learn to teach themselves additional vocabulary (i.e. teach them the words that will help them be competent readers in the language).

Assessing Vocabulary

This quarter I’m trying something new to teach and assess essential vocabulary. Throughout the quarter I am creating a running list of high-frequency vocabulary for which we will create TPR gestures (Total Physical Response — See James Asher’s book for more information) in class.

Each day we will learn five words/phrases, assign gestures, practice them a bit, and use them in context for as long as student interest remains high. The next day we will review the previous day’s gestures, learn five more, and repeat the process. This is a powerful way to build essential vocabulary fast as it does the following:

Day 1

  1. Present Word in Spanish
  2. Translate Word to English
  3. Invent Gesture (repeat 1-3 with all target vocabulary for the day)
  4. Discuss the gestures in context using L2 via Personalized Questions and Answers (PQA)

Day 2

  1. Review TPR gestures from the previous day (present word in Spanish, show comprehension via the gesture we invented).
  2. Present New Vocabulary in Spanish
  3. Translate New Vocabulary to English
  4. Invent Gesture (repeat 2-4 with all target vocabulary for the day)

Day 3

  1. Review TPR gestures from the previous day (present word in Spanish, show comprehension via the gesture we invented)*.
  2. Present New Vocabulary in Spanish
  3. Translate New Vocabulary to English
  4. Invent Gesture (repeat 2-4 with all target vocabulary for the day)

Repeat the process everyday, or as often as you’d like. The more frequent the better.

*Reviewing all the TPR gestures will get lengthy, so perhaps you do all the gestures for a few weeks, but then only do a sampling of gestures before adding that days new vocabulary.

Students are asked to recall the meaning of the Spanish word using a gesture. Notice how the English translation is removed from the process? TPR short-circuits English and establishes meaning in the TL by the second day. From that point on they are recalling the meaning via a gesture and not via English like they would be with flashcards or some other method. Powerful stuff.

Note: I learned Spanish in high school and beyond. TPR was instrumental to my acquisition since it gave me chunks of language that I used to read stories in Spanish, which recycled this vocabulary enough to make the words stick in my brain. I can still clearly remember the TPR gestures we used for many words. I think that letting students pick the gesture is a way for them to take ownership and gives gestures a more personal meaning.

Another benefit of TPR is that students can self-assess whether or not they know this vocabulary as we review as a class. Furthermore, they can ask for clarification, and they can quickly study and learn this vocabulary in class.

We will go through this routine at the beginning of class all quarter, except for a few days when we have a chapter pretest or are doing some other activity that takes a while.

There are roughly 50 class days in my quarter. At five words per day X 50 days, students are responsible for approximately 250 TPR words and phrases. At the end of the quarter they will have a Final Vocabulary Test where I show the class 50 random gestures in a video, and they will have to write down the correct word on a piece of paper.

Since this is my first time doing this assessment, I will report back the results. But I suspect this to be a large enough sample to accurately assess how much vocabulary students actually possess.

Disclosure: Please note that some of the links above are affiliate links, and at no additional cost to you, I will earn a commission if you decide to make a purchase after clicking through the link. Please understand that I have experienced all of these books/products and I recommend them because they are helpful and useful, not because of the small commissions I make if you decide to buy something through my links. Please do not spend any money on these products unless you feel you need them or that they will help you achieve your goals.

Assessing with Storytelling: Homework

 Online grammar workbooks are the trend in higher education, but they aren’t the most efficient use of time.

When I learn languages on my own I read, read, and read some more. This is perhaps the best way to acquire vocabulary and, therefore, grammar. As linguist John Pasden puts it in a post entitled Flashcards: That’s Not How It Works!, “reading is the original spaced repetition.”

I am convinced that the ideal homework for language learners should be to listen to and read level-appropriate language that they find compelling. I define level-appropriate input as i + 1, not i + 100. This means that Language 101 students would be better served to read and listen to language that shelters vocabulary. Reading the newspaper in Spanish won’t hurt beginners, but it will be highly incomprehensible and, thus, an inefficient use of time.

With this in mind, I am piloting* a digital workbook in my 101 classes that will help students acquire 50 of the most important words in Spanish through reading. Each night, students will have reading homework that puts the vocabulary and grammar I want them to acquire in context. The readings build off each other and at the end of the workbook I will test to see what they have acquired.

I will detail this pilot homework program in another post, but this nightly reading homework will give students another chance to negotiate meaning and mentally process the language.

The ultimate goal of this homework program is to prepare students to read one of the many CI readers available for beginners. The earlier learners start reading for fun in the language, the faster they will acquire, the more they will acquire, and the easier our jobs will be as educators.

This kind of homework fits nicely with storytelling. We tell and co-create stories so our students can seek out other stories that interest them. In this way, we create lifelong, independent language learners.

*Unofficially. This is just an experiment my classroom.

Online Textbook Homework

My department adopted Panorama from Vista Higher Learning. This comes with an online workbook that students use to practice the language. It’s better than some online workbooks, but it has a definite grammar focus with videos explaining grammar concepts in English. These videos are dreadfully boring, and they don’t help students build mental representation of the language (Further reading: an excellent post by Chris Stolz that summarizes Dr. Bill VanPatten’s idea of mental representation).

In some cases we can’t escape using the textbook entirely. In my context, for example, I am required to use the online workbook for homework. And since students have to use it, I want to ensure they get the most out of their effort. I do a few things to accomplish this:

  1. I assign mostly listening comprehension, multiple choice fill-in-the-blank, and fill-in-the-blank translation activities (i.e. Pablo ________ [to eat] una pizza). I do assign a few of the paragraphs with random blanks, but they have diminishing returns.
  2. I spend some time in class going over the assigned activities and “PQA”*-ing some of the unfamiliar vocabulary. This helps keep this homework comprehensible and makes it somewhat worthwhile for them to do.
  3. I limit student exposure to this homework in terms of their final grade. In fact, some of my students choose to never complete these assignments, but can still pass the class. The most skipping all the online workbook homework can do is drop their grade by a little less than 10 percent, or about a full letter grade. It’s there to give students a chance to improve their skills, not to as an assessment tool.
  4. I tell students about other things they can do to increase their proficiency (e.g. reading, listening, seeking out other forms of compelling input).

*PQA – Personalized Questions and Answers

I should also note that students always complain about the online homework as being too hard, and I agree with them. It is hard because we don’t learn language by practicing but rather through the mental processing of input. To quote the great Carl Sagan:

“The brain does much more than just recollect. It inter-compares, it synthesizes, it analyzes, it generates abstractions. The simplest thought, like the concept of the number one, has an elaborate logical underpinning. The brain has its own language for testing the structure and consistency of the world.”

Indeed, the brain has its own language for grammar too. Textbook rules only attempt to explain the phenomenon of language as we observe it. They are not what our brains use to produce language.

One day I would like to see us move away from these language “practicing” systems and over to ones that provide more and varied forms of compelling, highly comprehensible input. In this way, students will have the opportunity to acquire language in a more natural, efficient, and self-sustaining manner.

Disclosure: Please note that some of the links above are affiliate links, and at no additional cost to you, I will earn a commission if you decide to make a purchase after clicking through the link. Please understand that I have experienced all of these books/products and I recommend them because they are helpful and useful, not because of the small commissions I make if you decide to buy something through my links. Please do not spend any money on these products unless you feel you need them or that they will help you achieve your goals.

Assessing with Storytelling: Oral Story Test

Picture notes are a personalized way to help students stay in the TL while retelling a story.

This is my favorite assessment of the quarter. Students pick any story from the quarter that we have read and they retell it to me as if I have never heard it before. Each story is about the same level of difficulty, so I don’t mind letting them pick one from the beginning of the quarter. The last story we co-create might even be easier for them since it’s fresher in their mind (In the past I have also just assigned the last story we co-created. It really doesn’t matter).

After students have completed the test, I ask questions about them that are related to the story they chose. For example, let’s say that in the story a character goes to a café and drinks a coffee (mmm, coffee). I may ask a student something like, “Do you drink coffee?”, “Do you prefer coffee or tea?”, or “What do you drink when you are thirsty?”. This provides a way to assess their conversational ability during a spontaneous interaction.

In a way, I suppose that I do prepare these questions. I make sure to include specific vocabulary and phrases in the written version of the stories, and this lends itself to asking certain questions. But I don’t write out a list of questions ahead of time, and instead take them from the text itself. 

(Note: I will do a separate post about how I introduce and structure stories throughout the quarter after I finish this current Assessing with Storytelling series.)

Notes

I allow students to use picture notes on this assessment with as many hand-drawn pictures as they like — one picture for each word or even each syllable if they want. The only caveat to these notes is that there can be no words on the paper or they can’t use it. In this way, students can focus on how to express themselves instead of being pressured into remembering every detail of the story.

The picture notes are not required, but maybe the should be. Students who take the time to draw out the story tend to perform way better than those who just try to memorize or remember everything without notes. If they draw enough pictures they always remember how to say something, even if it’s not perfectly accurate.

I use this assessment as my final exam, which is usually a 2-hour block for me. When I’m done with the block of tests I’m mentally exhausted from listening to all these students, but I’m done grading. I’d argue that this is the mark of a great assessment.

In Groups or Individually?

I keep going back and forth on this one. Some quarters I have had students go individually. This provides the best feedback for students, but takes way longer and gives me the impression that I may be intimidating some students (I’ve had some students cry one-on-one due to the test anxiety—Granted, they also could have cried in a group).

Other quarters I’ve put students in groups of two and had them each tell half the story. This way they have to listen to each other and pick up where the other left off. If you let them pick the story

I pick the groups, and they don’t know which half of the story they’re going to retell. That way they have to prepare the whole thing. Really the whole thing is to get them to do a deep dive on a story and get more comprehensible input. My son does this naturally by picking the same story to read over and over, but adults need a little prodding to do this behavior. This is the perfect way to get them to reread a story from class.

Note: If you want then to tell the story in groups and let students pick which story they want to retell, you need to know ahead of time which students studied which story. That way students who studied Story A can go with other students who also studied Story A. 

In Front of the Class or in Private?

I let the small groups go privately at an assigned time. The rest of the students wait out in the hall/lobby until they are called into the classroom. The idea behind this assessment is to see what students can produce, and talking in front of the class on a test doesn’t do anything but raise the affective filter. The test itself is enough anxiety, even though I aim for it to be as low-key as possible.

How I Grade the Oral Story Test

Just like the Final Writing Project, I have a rubric for grading this assessment. It helps me to be more objective, and it lets me finish grading as soon as they’re done taking the test.

Note: While students are talking, I scribble notes on a blank piece of paper so I can remember what students said on the test. This practice has come in handy on more than one occasion when a student has come seen me for additional feedback or the time I forgot to circle the scores on my rubric. Let’s just say I’m glad I wrote down what they said.

Communication and Flow

10 203040
Student could not communicate in Spanish. Student could not respond freely to instructor’s questions using emerging output in Spanish.
Use of English.
Student demonstrated limited communication in Spanish. Student responded to some of the instructor’s questions freely using emerging  output in Spanish that approached the expected level.Student demonstrated level-appropriate communication of a message (i.e. the events of a story) in Spanish. Student responded to most questions using level-appropriate emerging output in Spanish.Student demonstrated above-average Successful communication of a specific message in Spanish. Student responded fluently to all the instructor’s questions using above-average emerging output in Spanish.

Like it’s written counterpart, communication is the most important factor that I look for when grading this assessment. I want to hear students being able to communicate the events of a story using only their emerging output in L2.

Grammar and Vocabulary

10203040
Student did not demonstrate understanding of relevant vocabulary. Student did not demonstrate natural or accurate production of grammatical forms, especially those covered in class.Student demonstrated some understanding of relevant vocabulary. Student demonstrated accurate production of  relevant grammatical forms below the expected level.Student demonstrated level-appropriate understanding of relevant vocabulary. Student demonstrated accurate production of vocabulary and grammatical forms, especially those covered in class.Student demonstrated above-average understanding of relevant vocabulary. Student demonstrated above-average production of  grammatical forms, especially those covered in class.

This is another one of the few times in my course that I evaluate grammar in context. Students have been afforded the opportunity to select and study the story and bring in picture notes. I’m looking for their grammar and vocabulary to be accurate.

Despite the generous design of this assessment, it’s still incredibly difficult for students to remember everything.  It is easy, however, to identify the forms and vocabulary students have acquired successfully.

Natural Progression of Fluency

5101520
Student demonstrated a lack confidence while speaking and interacting, which was highlighted by frequent and long hesitations in Spanish (e.g. long pauses. Many “ums,” “uhs,” and/or other English filler words).Student demonstrated a lack confidence while speaking and interacting, which was highlighted by some hesitation in Spanish (e.g. some long pauses. Many “ums,” “uhs,” and/or other English filler words).Student demonstrated adequate confidence while speaking and interacting, which was highlighted by  a lack of hesitation in Spanish (e.g. few pauses and very infrequent use of “ums,” “uhs,” and/or other English filler words).Student demonstrated a high degree of confidence while speaking and interacting in Spanish, which was highlighted by few (if any) pauses. Use of Spanish filler words such as  “bueno” “pues”, “este”, etc.

Last summer I attended a second TPRS© workshop, this one in Seattle. The presenter was Mike Coxon, and he defined fluency as students demonstrating “confidence, accuracy, and a lack of hesitation”. I like this definition of fluency. As a long-term goal, we want students to speak confidently and accurately, not with a bunch of errors in their speech. we also wan them to speak without hesitation. We don’t want them to think about the language; we want them to think in the language.

I’m sure this isn’t the perfect rubric, but I also believe it gives me a fairly accurate picture of my students’ ability to speak the language.

I look forward to this assessment every quarter. It’s the easiest thing in the world to grade, and it lets me see how far they have come during the short time we spent together.