Storytelling Basics – Day 1: Getting to Know You with CardTalk

CardTalk
Having students generate the “vocabulary list” via CardTalk is a brilliant way to build community and establish L2 norms.

Each of us has a story to tell. We need to leverage this as language educators. I start out the term using something that has been termed “CardTalk” in the comprehensible input community.

Conversation Gold

In this activity, students take a sheet of paper, fold it “hotdog style”, and complete these three items:

  1. Write their name in big letters on the side facing out. We will use this to learn names of the members of our newly forming community.
  2. Next to their name, students draw something they like to do. It can be any activity. The idea is that it’s something that interests them. I want them to drive the vocabulary we learn in the first week of class. It’s much easier for them if it’s relevant vocabulary. That means relevant to the students, not to any agenda of mine. This is especially important to making storytelling/TCI work for adult learners.
  3. On the back of the paper, students draw an animal that they either have or want to have. It can be any animal. Here I have an agenda. I want to teach the words “to want” and “to have”. 

I give students a few minutes to do this and then begin. This is the first day of class, so I have two goals. First, I want to start immersing students with CI in L2. I do this by circling, which is making a statement and then asking of repetitive questions about that statement (I will be doing a “Storytelling Basics” series of posts in the near future, and “Circling” is one of those incredibly important tools that lead to tons and tons of CI). 

I begin this activity by making a statement about myself, usually something about my love for coffee

Instructor: Class, I drink coffee.
Instructor: Class, do I drink coffee or tea?
Class: Coffee.
Instructor: Yes, that’s right. I drink coffee. I drink lots of coffee. I don’t drink tea, that’s ridiculous. I drink coffee.
Instructor: Class, do I drink Coca-Cola?
Class: No.
Instructor: No, I don’t drink Coca-Cola. I drink coffee.
Instructor: Class, what do I drink?
Class: Coffee.
Instructor: Yes, that’s right. I drink coffee. Who else drinks coffee?

With that transition question at the end I start to talk about that student and move away from myself for the time being. I’ve modeled “I” questions and answers, and will now ask “you” and “s/he” questions. Like a cow in a tornado, students immediately get sucked into the vortex of communicating in L2.

My second goal with this exercise is to set the tone and expectations for the class. I want students to know that we will be communicating in L2 90%+ of the time. I want students to know that when we have a class conversation (e.g. when we co-create a story), I need them to answer out loud as a class unit. That way I can see who is processing and who is just sitting there. Lastly and, perhaps most importantly, I want students to know that they are the focus of this class. If we want to build community, this is a sure-fire way to do it.

We use this activity every day during the first week of class. You could extend this activity to last a month, but I don’t recommend doing so, as it tends to lose some of its novelty after the first week. Novelty is your friend, especially in the first weeks of instruction.

L1 or L2 Instructions

When I was in college I took a year of German. I remember the first day being completely lost in the language. With this experience in mind, I decided to give instructions in English on the first day. It’s faster, and we can get to working on real meat and potatoes sooner.

However, this year I have decided to do this in L2 and have made a slideshow (which you can download here for free) to help make the instructions highly comprehensible. I will edit this post and let you know how it goes. I think this is a happy compromise, and also further norms the class to expect comprehensible instructions in L2, with the keyword being “comprehensible”. 

Edit: I’m really satisfied with how the slideshow instructions turned out. It kept us in L2 from the very beginning. I’m not convinced everything was 100% comprehensible, especially to the slower processors, but the keywords I was targeting were absolutely clear. I will be making more of these slideshows and embedded videos to use in various contexts, but more on that later.

Takeaways

I’m not sure who invented this activity, but it is absolutely brilliant. Students need an unbelievable amount of repetitive and comprehensible input to start making substantial progress in the language, and this is much easier to attain if the input is relevant. By having students draw an activity that they like to do, they are already learning something relevant to them. This helps build rapport with students and helps me make an individual connection with each student as I go around the room.

With a rudimentary grasp on this personalized vocabulary and some of the key verbs that always seem to come up – to be, to want, to have, to go, to like — and handful of one word images under our belts, we will be ready to co-create our first story beginning week two.

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